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CDC says Heparin Syringes may have caused bloodstream infection outbreak


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From PSQH Magazine

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has confirmed 14 cases of bloodstream infections in children that may be linked to syringes of heparin and saline made by Becton Dickinson and Co., Reuters reported. The cases were caused by the same strain of the Serratia marcescens bacterium.

The infections occurred in seriously ill children who received intravenous medications through a catheter or central line in Tennessee, Colorado, Minnesota, and Ohio. No deaths have been associated with the infections and the number of cases is dwindling, the CDC said.

Health officials started testing the Becton Dickinson products after discovering the syringes had been used to treat several of the infected children. Saline or heparin are often used to flush central lines to keep them clear.

Reuters reported that so far, none of the Becton Dickinson products have tested positive for the bacterium. In April, Becton Dickinson recalled 949 lots of its BD PosiFlush Pre-Filled Heparin Lock Flush Syringes and Pre-Filled Normal Saline saline flush syringes sold between February and December 2017.

All of the recalled products were made at Becton Dickinson’s facility in Franklin, Wisconsin.